Brown Bag Seminars

The format of the seminars can vary but they will all be informal and discussion-oriented. Open to PhD-students, postdocs and senior researchers. The seminars will take place from 12.00-14.00. You can bring your own lunch. Venue: Rozier, room 100.038


Upcoming Seminars:

Hacking Gender in journalism

29 April 2019: Sara De Vuyst

Dr. Sara De Vuyst is a postdoctoralresearcher at the Department of Communication Studies at Ghent University. Her research interests are feminist media studies, and more specifically, gender issues andtechnological innovation journalism. She is currently working on a postdoc that explores online abuse of journalists from an intersectional perspective. Sara De Vuyst is vice-chair of the ECREA Gender and Communication section. 

Location: Faculteitszaal/Videoconferencezaal, Campus Boekentoren, gebouw 05.03 - Blandijn
Adress: Blandijnberg 2, 9000 Gent

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Past Seminars:

SWAPPING AND STEALING: MARRIAGE, PLAY AND POLYAMORY IN NORTHWEST NAMIBIA. (OR WHY HARMFUL TRADITIONAL PRACTICES ARE PERHAPS NOT AS HARMFUL AS OFTEN ASSUMED).

18 MARCH 2019: STEVEN VAN WOLPUTTE

Steven Van Wolputte is professor of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Africa (IARA), KU Leuven. He has published in the fields of material and popular culture, political anthropology and of the anthropology of the body. Besides the impact of rapid urbanization on intimacy and close relationships, his current research interests include the anthropology of human security in Africa and a research project on how makerspaces imagine and make the African city of the future.  For more information: see https://www.kuleuven.be/wieiswie/en/person/00017725

This seminar will take place from 11:00-13:00. 

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BODILY CARE, CLOTHES AND SHOES FROM INDIA TO CHINA

28 JANUARY 2019: ANN HEIRMAN

Ann Heirman, Ph.D. (1998) in Oriental Languages and Cultures, is professor of Chinese Language and Culture and head of the Centre for Buddhist Studies at Ghent University in Belgium. She has published extensively on Chinese Buddhist monasticism and the development of disciplinary rules, including Rules for Nuns according to the Dharmaguptakavinaya (Motilal Banarsidass, 2002), The Spread of Buddhism (Brill, edited volume with Stephan Peter Bumbacher, 2007), A Pure Mind in a Clean Body (with Mathieu Torck, Academia Press, 2012), and Buddhist Encounters and Identities Across East Asia (Brill, edited volume with Carmen Meinert and Christoph Anderl, 2018).

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NEGOTIATED SEXUAL ETHICS AMONG WOMEN CONVERTING TO JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM IN THE NETHERLANDS

17 DECEMBER 2018: LIEKE SCHRIJVERS 

Lieke Schrijvers is a cultural anthropologist and PhD candidate in religious studies and gender studies at the department of Philosophy and Religious Studies in Utrecht University, in a joint doctorate with the research centre for Culture and Gender at Ghent University. Her current research is a comparative anthropological study of female converts in Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities in the Netherlands, and their negotiations of norms and guidelines relating to gender and sexuality.

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SEARCHES AND REUNIONS BETWEEN NEPALESE ADOPTEES AND BIRTH FAMILIES

19 NOVEMBER 2018: CHANDRA KALA CLEMENTE MARTÍNEZ

Chandra Kala Clemente Martínez is Anthropologist (BA, MA) and PhD Candidate in Social and Cultural Anthropology, as a Training Programme for Academic Staff Fellowship Holder, affiliated to AFIN Research Group in Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research examines the origins in transnational adoption, paying special attention to the experiences of searches and reunions in adoptions between Spain and Nepal. It analyses adoptees’ and adoptive families’ interest in ‘origins’ and perceptions, motivations, challenges and results of ‘return journeys, as well as experiences of first families in relation to their children’s return. Altogether, her research explores connections and disconnections between adoptive and first families.

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ICT4D, GENDER CULTURES AND THE MYTH OF DECENT WORK: YOUNG WOMEN IN SOUTH AFRICAN CALL CENTRES

5 NOVEMBER 2018: SISA NGABAZA

sisa

Biography: Dr. Sisa Ngabaza teaches in the department of Women and Gender Studies at the University of the Western Cape. Her research interests focus on gender, youth, adolescent sexuality, adolescent pregnancy, parenting and power relations. 

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EMOTIONAL AND AFFECTIVE LABOUR IN PRACTICES OF MOM BLOGGING

15 OCTOBER 2018: KATARIINA MÄKINEN

Katariina Mäkinen is a postdoctoral researcher in gender studies in the University of Tampere. Her PhD research on work-related coaching traced the intersections of individualization and gender in the context of late capitalism, and was followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at the Helsinki Collegium (2013-15) where she developed a project interrogating anti-immigration activism from the perspectives of neoliberal citizenship regimes and relations of class. Her current project, funded by the Academy of Finland, investigates mom blogging as a new form of gendered work. 

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EATING THE ADOPTEE: CULTURAL COMMODIFICATION, WHITENESS AND INTERRACIAL INTIMACIES IN BOLIVIAN-BELGIAN ADOPTION

20 JUNE 2018: CHRISTOF BEX 

Christof Bex is a doctoral researcher at the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO), affiliated to the Department of Languages and Cultures of Ghent University, and member of the Centre for Research on Culture and Gender. He obtained a master's degree in Sociology (2015) and Gender and Diversity Studies (2016). He is currently doing a doctoral research on transnational adoption from Bolivia with a specific interest in race, whiteness, gender, kinship, motherhood and transnational care. 

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BLACK GERMAN WOMEN, THE MATRILINEAL DIASPORA AND AUDRE LORDE

11 JUNE 2018: CASSANDRA ELLERBE

Cassandra Ellerbe studied at the universities of Paris (VIII) in France, and the LMU in Munich, Germany (M.A) and has a PhD from Ghent University (2006) in Comparative Cultural Studies/Anthropology. She has worked as a researcher in various cross-border EU funded projects in the fields of ethnography, cultural studies, Black European studies, gender, intersectional theory, social justice, refugees and migrants, and diversity. Cassandra is a certified diversity/social justice and empowerment trainer for People of Color in Germany, and network member of the Black Diaspora in Germany Scholars Project funded by the German Research Foundation (2010-2014). She currently lectures at Bard College Berlin on issues related to social justice and diversity and conducts empowerment workshops for Black migrant and refugee women in Berlin.

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KURDISH WOMEN AND THE LIMITS OF GAINING VOICE.

28 MAY 2018: MARLENE SCHÄFERS

 Marlene Schäfers is a social anthropologist and currently FWO [PEGASUS]Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the Middle East and North Africa Research Group at Ghent University, Belgium. She obtained a PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2015 with a dissertation centering on the struggles for voice and audibility on the part of Kurdish women in Turkey. Her research focuses on the impact of state violence on intimate and gendered lives, the politics of memory and history, and the intersections of affect and politics. Her work has been published in the European Journal of Turkish StudiesSocial Anthropologyand the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

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NYAANYO, COURAGEOUS SISTERS, AND THE NGO: AN ETHNOGRAPHY OF QUEER WOMEN AND TRANSNATIONALIZATION IN ACCRA, GHANA

16 APRIL 2018: HEATHER TUCKER

Heather’s PhD research is focused on an 8 month long ethnography about local knowledge systems in Accra, Ghana, regarding female same sex intimacy and the ways in which these are changing in relationship to technologies as well as NGOization (i.e. LGBT focused groups).  She is a PhD candidate at the Gender Studies department at Central European University, with a focus in cultural anthropology.  Heather is also a former visiting researcher at the University of Amsterdam, and a former research associate with: the Centre for Popular Education and Human Rights, in Accra; the Human Rights Centre in Accra;  and the Refugee Law Project, in Kampala, Uganda.    In addition, Heather works as a gender and sexuality consultant building on ethnographic insights on issues of intersectionality and capacity building for organizations in both the north and south.

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MOTHERHOOD, VOLUNTARY CHILDLESSNESS AND CHRISTIANITY: NARRATIVES OF CHOICE

19 MARCH 2018: DAWN LLEWELLLYN

How do Christian women understand their reproductive choices? How do they navigate the religious expectation to have children at a time when more women are choosing not to become mothers? What personal, social, and institutional factors feature in women’s decision-making regarding motherhood and childlessness? How do women interpret the ways motherhood is enshrined in scripture, doctrine, teaching, and everyday Church practices? This paper draws on a current project examining the discourses and practices of ‘choice’ towards motherhood or elective childlessness in contemporary Christianity. Using a narrative approach (Bold 2012; Ellis 2004) I conducted interviews with Christian women about the process of considering motherhood and childlessness, the impact that reproductive agency has on women’s faith development, and the potential tensions of these ‘choices’  in a family-affirming tradition.

Dawn Llewellyn is Senior Lecturer in Christian Studies at the University of Chester. She is the author ofReading, Feminism, and Spirituality: Troubling the Waves (Palgrave, 2015); has co-edited Religion, Equalities and Inequalities (Routledge, 2016) with Sonya Sharma and Reading Spiritualities (Ashgate, 2008)with Deborah F. Sawyer.

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TRAVELLING AMONG KALBELIYA DANCERS: FROM STAGING OF AUTHENTICITY TO INTERCULTURAL DIALOGUES IN INDIAN DANCE PRACTICE

18 DECEMBER 2017: AYLA JONCHEERE

This event will take place in Rozier 44 , CRCG meeting room, 12.00 - 14.00

Ayla Joncheere holds a PhD degree in Oriental Languages and Cultures (India) from Ghent University (2016). Her BOF-funded research project (2012 – 2016) was entitled Kālbeliyās – Dancers, Gypsies or Snake Charmers: Staging of Authenticity and Dynamics of Identity. She began her training in Kalbeliya dance at the age of twelve (2001), and spent considerable time touring in Europe with Rajasthani artists. Since 2006, she began traveling to India on a regular basis to work with Kalbeliya dancers and other artist communities in Rajasthan. She also holds a postgraduate in Cultural Management from Artevelde Hogeschool (2011). She currently works as a post-doctoral researcher (BOF) on a project about practitioners of Kalbeliya dance in Europe and the USA. She has been performing in multiple dance projects, and is the co-founder of the dance collective, MaGenta.

For more information:  or webpage Ayla Joncheere

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THE SOCIOCULTURAL CONSTRUCTION OF FEMALE IDENTITY IN PINAR DEL RÍO (CUBA) IN YOUNG WOMEN (18 TO 35 YEARS) (CANCELLED) 

12 DECEMBER 2017: BELKIS ROJAS HERNÁNDEZ

This event will take place in Rozier 44 , CRCG meeting room, 12.00 - 14.00

Belkis Rojas Hernández is Professor of Sociology of Gender and Methodology of Research at the University of Pinar del Río (Cuba), where she teaches undergraduate courses in Sociocultural Studies and postgraduate ones in Sociology of Education, History and Criticism of Sociological Theories, and Theory of Social Work. She is the Principal Investigator of various projects on educational systems, gender relations and domestic violence in the contemporary Cuban sociocultural context, funded by VLIR-UOS, Oxfam, the British Embassy, and the Cuban Ministry of Education, among others. Her research has been published in the national and international peer-reviewed journals, such as Contemporary dilemmas: Education, Politics and Values, and International Journal of Sociology

Register by sending an email to Carine.Plancke@UGent.be


POLITICS AS MEDICINE, MEDICINE AS POLITICS: 'ANTHROPOLOGIZING' AFRICAN HISTORY'

29 NOVEMBER 2017: KOEN STROEKEN

This event will take place in Rozier 44 , CRCG meeting room, 12.00 - 14.00

Koen Stroeken is an associate professor in Africanist anthropology (UGent), who has published about fifty papers and authored three international peer-reviewed books, of which one monograph (Moral Power, Berghahn), all largely dealing with cosmology and materiality. A forthcoming book seeks to ‘anthropologize’ the history of kingship in east and central Africa. He specializes in the cultural mediation of local epistemologies approached as systems worthy of study in their own right as well as bases for new insights in global processes. Stroeken coordinates since 2012 a VLIRUOS-IUS academic exchange with Mzumbe University (Tanzania) and is or has been supervising a dozen PhD projects, one of which a collaborative project about initiatory objects at the Royal Museum of Central Africa.

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FEMALE MIGRANTS IN BELGIUM AND CAMPAIGNS OF SOLIDARITY WITH MUSLIM WOMEN
19 JUNE 2017: LADAN RAHBARI

This event will take place in Rozier 44 , CRCG meeting room, 12.00 - 14.00

Ladan Rahbari is a social anthropologist; she has a PhD in Sociology (University of Mazandaran), a Master’s degree in Anthropology (Tehran University) and a Bachelor’s degree in Italian Literature (Tehran University). She is now conducting a joint PhD research project in Ghent University and Vrije Universiteit Brussel. This research project ‘A Critical Analysis of Cross-Cultural Discourses and Moral Understandings of Gender, Sexuality and Embodiment’ (2015-2019) is funded by Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) and is under supervision of Prof. Dr. Gily Coene (Vrije Universitetit Brussel) and Prof. Dr. Chia Longman (Universiteit Gent) and consists of two joint doctoral research projects conducted by Dr. Ladan Rahbari and Susan Dierickx.


Rahbari has teaching experience in various BA and MA programs of anthropology, art studies and social sciences in several universities. Her research interests include gender politics, sexuality, space, body and harmful cultural practices with a general focus on the Middle East and migrant populations, and in the frameworks of radical and postcolonial feminist theories. She is currently affiliated with the Centre for Research on Culture and Gender (CRCG, UGent) and Centre of Expertise on Gender, Diversity and Intersectionality (RHEA, VUB).
Ladan's CV

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"I'M TOO OLD FOR THAT NOW": THE IMPORTANCE OF LIFE COURSE IN STUDENT NIGHTLIFE NORMATIVITIES

6 JUNE 2017: VALERIE DE CRAENE

This event will take place in Rozier 44 , CRCG meeting room, 12:30- 14:30

Valerie De Craene graduated as (human) geographer at the University of Ghent in 2009. Afterwards, she worked as a teaching assistant at the University of Leuven. Her doctoral research focuses on the deconstruction and (re)production of heteronormativities within student nightlife in Flanders. She is also editor of AGORA.

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27 June 2016: Transgender in Iran: Movie and Discussion

This event will take place in Rozier 44, Lecture Hall O (not in room 100.038)

The documentary 'Be Like Others' (also known as Transsexual in Iran) is a 2008 documentary film written and directed by Tanaz Eshaghian about transsexuals in Iran. It explores issues of gender and sexual identity while following the personal stories of some of the patients at a Teheran gender reassignment clinic. The film played at the Sundance Film Festival and the Berlin International Film Festival, winning three international awards. The documentary is about an hour long and is in English.

A discussion session (in English) will follow the viewing of the movie. Invited discussants include Dr. Joz Motmans, coordinator of the Transgender Infopunt and Dr. Ladan Rahbari.

Registration is required for attendance. Please register by sending an email to ladan.rahbari@ugent.be



21 June 2016: Andreas Niehaus: Food as Medicine in Edo-period Japan

Andreas Niehaus, Japanese Studies; Department of Languages and Cultures, Ghent University

Andreas Niehaus studied Japanese Language and Culture, German Literature and English Literature at the University of Cologne, where he also defended his PhD. In 2004 he was appointed professor at Ghent University.In 2010 he became head of the Department of South and East Asian Languages and Cultures and in 2012 head of the Department of the new Department of Languages and Cultures. Since 2015 he is also head of the International Office of the Faculty of Arts and Philosophy.
His main research interests are body cultures of Japan including Japanese sport history during the Meiji and early Shôwa-period, Olympic history, national and cultural memories in Japan and lately ideas of the body and ideology during the Edo-period.

Registration is required for attendance. Please register by sending an email to


29 February 2016: Rozita Dimova: Ethnographic observations of objects, things, commodities, designs,...

Prof. Dr. Rozita Dimova is Associate Professor in Slavonic and East-European Studies (2013-pres), Department of Languages and Cultures, Ghent University. Before she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle (2003-2006), Free University Berlin (2006-2009) and Humboldt University Berlin (2010-2013). Her work has engaged a broad range of theoretical and ethnographic issues. Her research interests include ethnic and national identities, class, gender, consumption/commodities, refugees, the state and the neo-liberal forms of governance in South-eastern Europe and in the West.


2 February 2016: Carine Plancke: 'Women’s dances in post-genocide Rwanda: Gender equality, female identity and the waning of the sacred'

Dr. Carine Plancke is a Marie Curie research fellow at the Centre for Dance Research of the University of Roehampton (UK) where she does research on dance, gender and reconstruction in post-genocide Rwanda. After completing her MA studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leuven, she enrolled for an Advanced Program in Women’s Studies at the University of Antwerp. She gained her PhD in Ethnology and Social Anthropology from the School for Advanced Studies in Social Sciences in Paris (EHESS) and the University of Leuven and was a Teaching and Research Fellow at the Universities of Nice and Clermont-Ferrand.  Her doctoral research deals with the mainly female song and dance performances and rituals of rural Punu communities in Congo-Brazzaville. As a result of this research, a monograph has been published (2014, Presses Universitaires du Mirail) as well as numerous articles in international, peer-reviewed journals such as Africa, Journal of Religion in Africa, Social Analysis, Journal for Ritual Studies and Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.

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16 November 2015: Ute Hüsken: 'Religion and Gender'

Prof. Dr. Ute Hüsken (University of Oslo) is Professor in the South Asia section of IKOS. She was educated as an Indian and Tibetan studies scholar and as a cultural anthropologist in Göttingen (Germany). She lectured at Göttingen University and later at the South Asia Institute at Heidelberg University (South Asia Institute). She teaches courses on religion in South Asia, Sanskrit, Pali, ancient and contemporary Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism. Hüsken was member of the executive committee of the Dynamics of Ritual collaborative research center at the University of Heidelberg, and was co-chair of the steering committee of the Ritual Studies Group (American Academy of Religion). Together with Ronald L. Grimes and Barry Stephenson (Canada) she is co-editor of the Oxford Ritual Studies Series (Oxford University Press).

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28 October 2015: Lisa Dikomitis: 'The Culture of Doing a PhD, a PhD in Cultural Research'

 

Dr. Lisa Dikomitis is a social anthropologist who has conducted fieldwork in Belgium, Cyprus and the United Kingdom. She is Lecturer in Social Research in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Hull (UK) where she teaches courses on qualitative research and etnographic practice. She is also the Programme Director of the MSC in Applied Social Research and has led several seminars for beginning PhD students. She currently supervises 6 students who are involved in social research ranging from Bangladeshi women in London, ageing in Yorkshire and perceptions on speedpedelecs. Dikomitis is the author of Cypris and its Places of Desire. Cultures of Displacement among Greek and Turkish Cypriot Refugees (IB Tauris, 2012) and the co-editor of When God Comes to Town: Religious Traditions in Urban Contexts (Berghahn Books, 2009, paperback 2012). In 2010 she ventured into health focusing especially on the experiences of health professionals and the ways they try to incorporate and engage with knowledge outside their medical competencies. She conducted fieldwork in a psychiatric hospital in Belgium before moving to the UK in 2012. In the north of England she continued working on the social aspects of health and has conducted fieldwork among patients, clinicians and medical students. The research includes studies on the recent NHS reforms, health inequalities and the perceptions of cluster headache. Before joining the University of Hull in March 2014 she worked at Ghent University (2004-2012) and at the Hull York Medical School (2012-2014).


24 September 2015: Sabine Grenz: 'How talking about one’s meaning of life makes sense: a discourse analytic approach to related qualitative interviews'

 

PD Dr. Sabine Grenz (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen)

After completing her studies in Educational Science, Sociology and Psychology at the University of Cologne she enrolled for an MSc Gender at the Gender Institute of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) where she was situated between 2001 und 2003 as a research student and in the academic year 2010-11 worked as a guest-lecturer.

2004 she completed her PhD in Gender Studies at Humboldt-University in Berlin where in 2005 she became postdoc in the research training group “Gender as a Category of Knowledge” and a researcher in 2007. 2008 and 2009 Sabine Grenz worked as post-doc at the University of Gothenburg. In 2010 she continued working on her research project about the constructions of femininity in women’s diaries of the Second World War with a gender equality scholarship from Humboldt-University in Berlin where in 2014 she qualified as a professor for Gender Studies.

2012 she began a new research project about gendered discourses of meanings of life at the Comenius-Institute in Muenster and 2013 started teaching as an assistant professor/researcher at the Georg-August-University of Goettingen. Since 2014 she is board member of the German Gender Studies association (Fachgesellschaft Geschlechterstudien). In 2015 she is visiting professor at Ghent University and is appointed acting professor at the Goettingen Institute for Diversity Research.

Her main research and teaching interests are: Gender epistemology and qualitative empirical methodology, Gender, diversity and intersectionality, Gender and religion(s), Gender and sexualities, Historical perspectives on gender constructions, Institutionalisation and academic history of Gender Studies